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Here’s the Secret Ingredient That Makes Ramen Noodles So Good

Here’s the Secret Ingredient That Makes Ramen Noodles So Good


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Ramen noodles are completely different from spaghetti

Ramen noodles are unlike any other pasta.

If you’ve ever eaten ramen (either at a ramen shop or from a Styrofoam cup), you’ve probably noticed that there’s just something… different about the noodles. So what’s the reason behind this much-lauded texture? One word: kansui.

Ramen noodles have four primary ingredients: wheat flour, water, salt, and kansui. Kansui is basically mineral water that’s slightly alkaline (the opposite of acidic), and it can trace its use in noodles back to the lakes of Inner Mongolia, which became legendary for this purpose hundreds of years ago. Today, it’s made by adding sodium carbonate, potassium carbonate, and sometimes phosphoric acid to mineral water.

So how does kansui work its magic, exactly? Alkaline water interferes with the enzymes in the wheat flour and partially inhibits the development of gluten and lowers the acidity. This allows the noodles to be stretched slightly more easily, and it also imparts that unique texture. The color turns yellow because of the kansui’s interaction with pigments in the wheat.

Alkalis like kansui, lye, and baking soda actually play a much larger role in food production than you may think. They give pretzels that dark brown shell, give corn tortillas that unique aroma and texture, are used in curing olives, and even give Oreo cookies their dark color and rich chocolatey flavor. For more details, check out this article by Harold McGee in the New York Times.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


The Complete Guide to Making Ramen at Home

The cult of the New American ramen joint, with its endless wait times and ghostly bowls of tonkotsu broth, has conspired to make the Japanese import feel off-limits to the humble home cook. After all, how could you possibly unlock the mysteries of miso, or crack the secrets of shoyu, when true ramen masters have spent years—if not decades—perfecting the dish?

Maybe you can’t, but that’s okay. “Any home cook can make chicken soup,” says David Koon, co-owner of ramen restaurant Chuko.

According to Koon, it’s important to remember that, ultimately, that’s all ramen is: soup with noodles—preferably soulful and well-balanced, but still simple in essence. So, yes, there is plenty of room to nerd out when it comes to the deep truths about ramen. But we’re not going to—not here, not today.

Let’s just agree that ramen has a storied culture and countless variations, and that it’s easy to get bogged down in head-scratching details when we talk about and eat it at the best establishments. That way, we can move onto the fact that ramen really only has four elements—noodles, broth, seasonings, and toppings. So while the question of the perfect noodle to pair with tonkotsu broth may remain one of the profound mysteries of the world, getting started on making your own ramen is easier than you think—especially with Koon by your side.

Here, we offer a beginner’s guide to making your own ramen. Get comfortable with the basics, then enjoy a lifetime of obsession.


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