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Pumpkin, Pecan, and 8 Other Autumn Beers You Need to Try Before Winter Comes

Pumpkin, Pecan, and 8 Other Autumn Beers You Need to Try Before Winter Comes


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Oh, fall. Sure, summertime is filled with sunlight, pool parties, and backyard barbecues, but autumn has plenty of things to bring to the table. Is there anything better than snuggling into your favorite sweater and sipping a pumpkin spice latte when it’s cold outside?

Pumpkin, Pecan, and 8 Other Autumn Beers You Need to Try Before Winter Comes

Speaking of pumpkin spice, it isn’t the only flavor that correlates with fall. Take a moment to remember your last Thanksgiving dinner, or brainstorm some of your favorite foods and drinks to indulge in when it starts feeling chilly outside. What are some seasonal specialties that come to mind? Maybe pecan pie, a warm cup of coffee, or a steaming bowl of oatmeal?

These foods and drinks are best enjoyed when it’s cold outside, but believe it or not, we’ve found something that will make your favorite fall flavors and dishes even that much better: turning them into a beer.

Luckily for you fall fans, there are plenty of breweries out there that offer a wide variety of autumnal brews, ranging from pumpkin beer to a seasonal breakfast blend. To make the transition to colder weather a little more enjoyable, we’ve rounded up 10 fall-flavored beers and where to get them once the summer ends.

Autumnal Molé Stout, Ska Brewing Co.

What could be more fall-friendly than a brew that literally has the word “autumn” in it? This beer is a unique, spicy twist on your normal fall flavors sure to give you a kick in the mouth and prepare you for the cold.

Best Brown Ale, Bell’s Brewery

Hints of caramel, cocoa, and a malt body make this beer a sure contender for our fall-flavored lineup. The malt flavor isn’t too heavy, which will make your summer-to-fall transition that much smoother.


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


50 Kids’ Activities and Crafts in the Fall

Smack in the middle of summer and winter is the sweet spot for all seasons: fall. This ‘cooling-off’ period’s most noteworthy signs include shorter days, longer nights, and the seemingly stunting of vegetation growth where leaves turn to a distinct auburn to faded yellow. This season carries with it a certain charm captivating families and children for an anticipatory (and joyous!) celebration ahead.

Fall happens from September to November. It’s a season that is anticipating two celebrations: Thanksgiving and Halloween. And while some states are contemplating on re-opening schools this fall, kids may be better off taking alternative learning mediums to cope with school requirements. Nonetheless, there are fun activities that you and your kids will surely enjoy even in the comforts of your own home. You and your family may also consider a ‘fall bucket list’ to get the children to make the most of this season.

By age 5 or 6, some children may start going to kindergarten. At age 5, children can speak more clearly, involving more simple sentences. They can count up to 10 or more and will be able to illustrate about six body parts or more. At school, they will be more adept at writing letters, numbers and can create triangles and other geometric illustrations. On the physical aspect, they are likely to be more active with more pronounced gross motor skills such as hopping, skipping, climbing, swinging, and doing somersaults.

By ages 6 to 8, children are more independent and are likely starting grade school. It’s also a time where they are likely to be more social with their peers and classmates. It’s a time where they are also taking on more school work and learn to value teamwork.

At age 9 to 11, your kids are well on their way to puberty. During this time, kids give more importance to developing healthy friendships with a strong pull towards peer pressure. It is also a time where they feel a growing sense of responsibility and set goals for what they want to achieve.

Play is crucial to this stage of the child’s development. As studies have already shown, the number of childhood obesity and hypertension is evident because of the lack of physical activities and improper diet. While gadgets may be to blame, parents or caregivers can actively play a role to encourage kids to participate in outdoor activities through play, exploration, or other creative means such as camps or getting them involved in sports.

Consider developing their physical skills during this stage. As kids grow older, their bodies are also expanding and allowing for wider range-of-motion movements. Any activities involving walking, running, climbing, or skipping are good outlets to help them attain balance. Adults can accompany small children in taking short trips in the park or nature walks to help them explore and gain new friends along the way. Older kids would benefit greatly from collaborative and competitive play to help develop their critical thinking. Moreover, the outdoor play exposes them to the sun, a good source of Vitamin D to help build their bones and strengthen their immune system.

Creative play involves activities like baking, craft-making, and even sports. Executive functions such as negotiating, prioritizing, planning, and multi-tasking are all developed during this type of play. Parents can get involved with this type of play by allowing unstructured time for kids to go about with the activity. This imaginative play could help boost their social skills as they seek to play with other kids. However, they may also be forced to play alone and forcibly think of ways to entertain and amuse themselves. Parents play an important role in guiding kids on how to go about with the process but also giving them space to decide independently.

Kids consider parents as immediate role models. This involvement creates a deep impact on their social and emotional development, especially with their academic performance. Parent-child interactions that come with play or meaningful activities such as baking or craft-making leave a lifelong impression on the child’s emotional and social development while enhancing their listening and talking skills.

Lastly, parent involvement helps kids with their self-esteem. With the current pandemic, children can derive confidence from their parents who serve as their teachers through alternative learning means. Parents involved in their child’s education and other interests enhance their ability to regulate emotions with lesser feelings of negativity. It’s also a way to help children navigate through life with lessons beyond the four corners of a classroom.

So take the opportunity to let your children have fun while learning. Spend time together and make lasting memories before winter arrives!


Watch the video: ΤΟ ΤΡΑΓΟΥΔΙ ΤΟΥ ΧΕΙΜΩΝΑ - με Α Ε Ι Ο ΟΥΜουσική: Hoffmann von FallerslebenΣτίχοι: Πολυξένη Ματέυ


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