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Nectarine and Blue Cheese Salad with Plum Vinaigrette

Nectarine and Blue Cheese Salad with Plum Vinaigrette


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Ingredients

  • 2 black plums, halved, pitted, chopped
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 teaspoons ume plum vinegar or red wine vinegar
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 12 cups (lightly packed) mixed greens (such as arugula and frisée)
  • 4 nectarines or peaches, halved, pitted, cut into eighths
  • 8 ounces firm blue cheese, such as Cabrales, sliced
  • 1/2 cup almonds, preferably Marcona

Recipe Preparation

  • Bring plums and 3/4 cup water to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-high and simmer, stirring occasionally and mashing plums with the back of a spoon, until plums have completely broken down, about 15 minutes.

  • Pour plum mixture through a fine-mesh sieve set over a small bowl, pressing on solids to extract as much purée as possible; discard solids in sieve. Let purée cool.

  • Add oil, vinegar, and 2 Tbsp. water to purée; whisk to blend. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Dressing can be made 1 week ahead. Cover and chill.

  • Divide greens among plates. Scatter nectarines, cheese, and almonds over, dividing equally, and drizzle some of dressing over. Season with salt and pepper.

,Photos by Christopher Baker

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (kcal) 320 Fat (g) 27 Saturated Fat (g) 8 Cholesterol (mg) 20 Carbohydrates (g) 13 Dietary Fiber (g) 3 Total Sugars (g) 8 Protein (g) 10 Sodium (mg) 470Reviews Section

Nectarine and Plum Cobbler

When I was little I had two very distinct favorite fruits, nectarines and plums. My mom would always purchase these fruits and I would bite into them just like you would an apple. In fact, to this day, I much prefer a plum or a nectarine to an apple and really only like my apples either cooked or already sliced. There’s just something about the sweetness of a plum or a nice, firm and ripe nectarine. A few weeks ago I tried my hand at a peach cobbler, and shared the finished product on Instagram. I ended up with messages and requests to share the recipe for the peach cobbler that I decided to rework the dessert just a bit and create a nectarine and plum cobbler. I had also recently received some P.A.N. Cornmeal and wanted to see if I could work that into the biscuit dough for a slightly different texture. The results? DIVINE!

My first task was to purchase my fruit. You want to pick fruit that is still firm so it will hold it’s shape in the oven, but also ripe enough to have a lot of natural sweetness and juiciness to lend to the flavor of the dish. So we want them slightly firm but not crisp, and sweet but not overly juicy. Easy, right? Well, this also helps with the task of peeling. One of my plums was far too juicy and made a bit of a mess, so err on the side of firm!

Now, let’s talk about P.A.N. Cornmeal. It’s the number one selling cornmeal in South American and is a staple in most Venezuelan homes. Although corn is native to the Americas, due to its rich nutrients and versatility it’s a staple in countries around the globe. P.A.N. Cornmeal has existed for many years and now it’s making its debut in the U.S. If you’re like me and like to try new ingredients and textures, be sure to add this to your shopping list! I found it to be a bit of a finer ground cornmeal than what I usually use in cornbread, so I think it’s perfect for these little cobbler biscuits. It lends a bit of a crunch to the batter which was missing from the original peach cobbler I had made, and I really like the contrast of flavors and textures between the nectarine plum filling and the cornmeal biscuit topping. Not only is it delicious, this dessert is quick and easy. Making the dough is a simple process that can be completed in the ten minutes that the fruit is cooking in the oven. I like the versatility that P.A.N. Cornmeal lends, as it can be used in such a wide variety of recipes.


How to Prepare Chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled Halloumi &ampamp Grilled Chicken in A Minutes at Home

Chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled Halloumi &amp Grilled Chicken

Hello everybody, hope you&rsquore having an amazing day today. Today, I will show you a way to prepare a special dish, chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled halloumi & grilled chicken. It is one of my favorites. For mine, I will make it a bit tasty. This will be really delicious.

Chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled Halloumi & Grilled Chicken is one of the most well liked of recent trending foods on earth. It is appreciated by millions daily. It&rsquos simple, it&rsquos quick, it tastes yummy. They&rsquore nice and they look wonderful. Chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled Halloumi & Grilled Chicken is something that I&rsquove loved my entire life.

Salt & Pepper to taste, then spoon the Honey_Chili nectarines on top. Slice the Halloumi Cheese up, then grill cheese slices in olive oil and a really hot pan. As soon as the cheese is grilled ready, just put onto the nektarine & the lettuce.

To get started with this particular recipe, we must prepare a few components. You can have chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled halloumi & grilled chicken using 11 ingredients and 4 steps. Here is how you can achieve that.

The ingredients needed to make Chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled Halloumi & Grilled Chicken:

  1. Make ready 200 g Blue Cheese
  2. Take 200 g Halloumi Cheese
  3. Make ready 4 Nectarines
  4. Make ready 1 medium Iceberg Lettuce
  5. Prepare 1 tbsp Chilli Sauce
  6. Prepare 1 tbsp Honey
  7. Prepare 2 tsp Salt
  8. Make ready 3 strands Coriander
  9. Prepare to taste Pepper
  10. Prepare 2 tbsp Olive Oil
  11. Get 1/2 Lemon

But also has a perfectly grilled steak, sliced and layered atop a bed of dressed lettuce. It's the perfect light lunch when you want to grill up some serious meat but skip the serious calorie load. Get our recipe for Grilled Mexican Steak Salad. *Notice: Approximate pre-cooked weights, actual weight may vary. Consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish or eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness, especially if you have certain medical conditions.

Instructions to make Chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled Halloumi & Grilled Chicken:

  1. As a first step, cut the nectarine into cloves and start to simmer in a heated pan with olive oil, adding chili sauce, honey, salt and pepper. Aim not to cook the nectarines, otherwise becomes mushy.
  2. Break the Iceberg lettuce into bigger chunks by hand, place them onto plate, seasoning with olive oil, lemon juices do crumbles of blue cheese. Salt & Pepper to taste, then spoon the Honey_Chili nectarines on top.
  3. Slice the Halloumi Cheese up, then grill cheese slices in olive oil and a really hot pan.
  4. As soon as the cheese is grilled ready, just put onto the nektarine & the lettuce. I added slices of Honey-Mustard Chicken Breast

This Grilled Chicken, Nectarine and Walnut Salad is a forkful of summer in every bite! *Notice: Approximate pre-cooked weights, actual weight may vary. Consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish or eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness, especially if you have certain medical conditions. Jammy grilled stone fruit and halloumi are the ultimate accompaniment to juicy marinated pork chops in this summer plum recipe.. Nectarine and Blue Cheese Salad with Plum Vinaigrette. Gorgeous golden brown pan-fried halloumi cheese tops this spinach and nectarine salad dressed with red onion and bell pepper for a crunchy bite..

So that&rsquos going to wrap it up for this special food chili, honey grilled nectarine on blue cheese salad bed with grilled halloumi & grilled chicken recipe. Thanks so much for reading. I am sure you will make this at home. There is gonna be more interesting food at home recipes coming up. Don&rsquot forget to save this page on your browser, and share it to your family, colleague and friends. Thank you for reading. Go on get cooking!


While the salad is delicious on its own, nothing pulls together a salad like a flavourful homemade vinaigrette. And this mint honey vinaigrette is the perfect topping for all the juicy stone fruit and briny crumbled feta.

The vinaigrette just requires 4 basic ingredients: oil, vinegar, honey and mint. Add them all to a blender and blend on high until emulsified.


14 Savory Stone Fruit Recipes to Showcase Summer’s Bounty

While summer produce is still at its peak, try these savory stone fruit recipes in between pies and crumbles.

Faced with a pile of ripe stone fruits, it’s natural to think of desserts like cobblers and crisps. But we also love using peaches and apricots in savory applications like salsas and salads, as well as throwing them on the grill alongside meat, giving a sweet summer twist to dinner.

So if you have backyard trees heavy with more fruit than you know what to do with, just received a jam-packed CSA delivery, or got a bit carried away at the farmers market, here are some unexpected savory stone fruit recipes to try.

1. Spicy Plum Chutney

Sweet-tart plums make amazing preserves, especially when you add a little spice. This is divine with cheese and crackers, used as a glaze for roasted carrots, or served as a condiment with pork or chicken. You can store it in the fridge for a couple weeks, or can it to make it shelf-stable for up to a year or longer. Get our Spicy Plum Chutney recipe.

Weck 19.6-Ounce Jars, 6 for $39.95 from Williams Sonoma

For storing the fruits of your labor.

2. Grilled Pork Chops with Fresh Plum Sauce

A quicker way to deal with a glut of plums is to turn them into a simple sauce for pork chops, tenderloin, or grilled chicken—or even tofu. Whatever protein you use, a five spice powder rub is a wonderful contrast to the fruity topping. Get our Grilled Pork Chops with Fresh Plum Sauce recipe.


Bet you didn’t know all of these were stone fruits

This story first appeared on Food52, an online community that gives you everything you need for a happier kitchen and home – that means tested recipes, a shop full of beautiful products, a cooking hotline, and everything in between!

Whether you're wandering around in a farmers market or passing through a section of the grocery store, odds are you've seen the term "stone fruit" tossed around near the peaches and plums. You put your keen mind to the task and gather that the term is referencing a fruit (great start) with a, well, stone-like pit. Nailed it! But is there more to the concept? What is a stone fruit, exactly?

What is a stone fruit?

We've already gone over the obvious: Stone fruits are those with pits in the center. Officially, they're fruits with a fleshy exterior known as the mesocarp (covered with a skin, or exocarp) that encases a stone or pit (the shell of which is a hardened endocarp with a seed inside). Also known as drupes, this category includes peaches, plums, cherries, nectarines, apricots, and pluots.

Dates, mangoes, coconuts, green almonds, lychees, and olives are also technically classified as stone fruits, as are mulberries, blackberries, and raspberries. Their peak season is summer, roughly mid-May through mid- to late-August.

Wait, some berries are stone fruits?

Botanically speaking, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica, a berry is a fleshy fruit with multiple seeds, deriving "from a single ovary of an individual flower." This category includes cranberries and blueberries, as well as bananas, grapes, tomatoes, and avocados, among others — but it does not include mulberries, blackberries, and raspberries.

While their name implies they are berries, mulberries, blackberries, and raspberries are actually aggregate fruits in the drupe or stone fruit family. Each mulberry, raspberry, or blackberry is a drupelet, or cluster of tiny drupes, each of which contains a single seed. (Strawberries are also aggregate fruit, but they're achenes, not drupes—a story for another day.)

Can we break down clingstone vs. freestone fruit, too?

You'll typically come across the terms "clingstone" and "freestone" with peaches. Unsurprisingly, they refer to whether the stone, or pit, stubbornly clings to the flesh or can be easily pulled out when the fruit is sliced open. According to the Peach Truck, clingstone peaches, which are in season from mid-May through early June, are great for eating but don't hold up as well to freezing or canning whereas freestones, available from mid-June to August, are great for anything: "You just slice the peach down the middle and pull it right off the pit."

What's this I hear about poisonous pits?

Technically, there is a dangerous chemical called amygdalin present in the seeds of stone fruits. According to the National Capital Poison Center, "poisoning can occur when the pit and seed are crushed or chewed before swallowing, releasing the amygdalin. Amygdalin is then converted by the body to cyanide." Um, yikes?

Still, the cyanide factor has not stopped several chefs from playing around with the ingredient. Food52 co-founder Amanda Hesser wrote about apricot pit ice cream for The New York Times in 2000, after trying it at Blue Hill in Manhattan. According to Shirley O. Corriher, a biochemist and the author of "Cookwise," whom Hesser interviewed for her piece, "It would take a lot of kernels to harm an adult." If you're interested in trying the recipe, we've got you covered. (Of course, if stone-fruit-pit ice cream isn't your speed, simply eat the fruit flesh.)

Ingredients

  • 45 to 50 apricot pits (4 1/2 ounces)
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup plus 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 7 egg yolks
  1. Wrap apricot pits in a heavy dish towel. On the floor or on a sturdy cutting board, crack pits open using a hammer or a meat mallet, exposing kernels. Watch your fingers.
  2. In a medium saucepan, combine apricot kernels and shells with milk and heavy cream. Bring to a boil turn off heat and let cool. Chill overnight in refrigerator.
  3. The next day, bring the milk mixture to a boil again and strain through a fine sieve. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together the sugar and the yolks until light and fluffy. Whisk about 1/2 cup hot milk into the egg mixture, and then whisk the egg mixture into the milk. Pour into a large saucepan, place over medium-low heat and, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, cook until thick enough to coat the back of the spoon. Remove from heat immediately. Let cool, and then strain.
  4. Pour into an ice cream maker and follow manufacturer's instructions.

Just a few of our favorite (sweet and savory!) stone fruit recipes


Summer Salad Recipes

Todd Coleman

When summer finally arrives after a long winter, it brings with it a huge bounty of fresh produce. One of the best ways to show this produce off is with a fresh, bright salad. We’ve rounded up 30 of our favorite salad recipes to highlight the best of summer’s fruits and vegetables.

Tomatoes are available year-round in American supermarkets, but good tomatoes are distinctly a summer treat. One of the best ways to show them off is in a caprese with burrata, basil, olive oil, and balsamic vinegar. Cherry or plum tomatoes pair with sweet corn—another summer treat—in our summer succotash. Or pair them with toasted bread to make panzanella.

Summer also brings fruit. Sweet watermelon and briny feta are a natural combination—add olives to double down on the briny pungency or jalapeños to add a spicy kick. Sweet-tart citrus works well in salads, too. Place honey grilled chicken on a bed of cilantro, grapefruit, and three kinds of orange for a refreshing main. Pomelo serves as an excellent base for a Thai salad with chiles, peanuts, and mint.

Thailand is home to many salads. The best known is som tum, or green papaya salad. This vibrantly flavored salad is packed cabbage, cucumber, dried shrimp, peanuts, fish sauce, and more. A variation can be made by substituting the green papaya for green mango and pairing it with green beans and grape tomatoes.

Find all of these salads and more in our collection of 30 summer salad recipes.

Cilantro Salad with Olives, Avocado, and Limes

Use this crisp, bright salad as a side dish or as a stand-in for chimichurri on top of fish, grilled meat, or chicken.”No matter where you fall on the cilantro spectrum,” says Bishara, “I urge you to try it.” Get the recipe for Cilantro Salad with Olives, Avocado, and Limes »

Chickpea Tofu Salad (Burmese Salad with Shan Tofu)

Chickpea Tofu Salad (Burmese Salad with Shan Tofu)

Iceberg Wedge with Lemon-Parsley Dressing

The classic wedge with a zesty upgrade. Get the recipe for Iceberg Wedge with Lemon-Parsley Dressing »

Homemade Crème Fraîche and Preserved Lemon Salad Dressing

Homemade Crème Fraîche and Preserved Lemon Salad Dressing

Hearts Of Palm and Avocado Salad

Hearts Of Palm and Avocado Salad

Quinoa Salad with Snap Peas, Scallions, and Mint

Quinoa Salad with Snap Peas, Scallions, and Mint

Get the recipe for Grilled Watermelon, Avocado, and Shrimp Salad »

Tomato-Cucumber Salad with Fennel Dressing

Tomatoes and cucumbers are a classic combination. Here, Eli Sussman of the Sussman Brothers modernizes the summer staple with heirloom varieties of the titular ingredients and brings them together with a caramelized fennel–lemon dressing. Get the recipe for Tomato-Cucumber Salad with Fennel Dressing »

Charred Cabbage Slaw

Charred Cabbage Slaw

Cucumber and Corn Salad with Pomegranate and Poppy Seeds

Cucumber and Corn Salad with Pomegranate and Poppy Seeds

Grilled Vegetable and Barley Salad

Grilled Vegetable and Barley Salad

Watermelon, Feta, and Jalapeño Salad

For a Southeast Asian spin, add fish sauce, chile, and Thai basil to the classic combination of watermelon and feta.

Tomato Salad with Green Beans and Basil

Tomato Salad with Green Beans and Basil

Honey-Grilled Chicken with Citrus Salad

Honey-Grilled Chicken with Citrus Salad

Ignacio Mattos’ Potato Salad

Boiling potatoes whole and unpeeled means they don’t absorb too much water as they cook. Mixing them with an egg yolk and olive oil yields a rich dressing without the heavy creaminess of mayonnaise. Get the recipe for Ignacio Mattos’ Potato Salad »

Peach and Plum Salad

In this salad red wine vinegar balances the sweetness of ripe fruit, while cilantro and basil add a floral note. Get the recipe for Peach and Plum Salad »

Puntarelle and Dandelion Green Salad with Honey and Olive Vinaigrette

Puntarelle and Dandelion Green Salad with Honey and Olive Vinaigrette

Watermelon Radish, Ahi Tuna, and Snap Pea Salad

Watermelon Radish, Ahi Tuna, and Snap Pea Salad

Caprese Salad

A dish as simple as caprese salad demands the best ingredients: Use firm, in-season tomatoes, the freshest burrata, and dress with pristine olive oil and top-quality balsamic vinegar. Get the recipe for Caprese Salad »

Blueberry, Nectarine and Shiso Salad

Bright shiso leaves and a touch of earthy sesame oil enhance this stone fruit and berry salad. Get the recipe for Blueberry, Nectarine and Shiso Salad »

Summer Bean Salad

Thai Green Papaya Salad (Som Tum)

Crusted dried shrimp add an umami boost to this papaya salad. Get the recipe for Thai Green Papaya Salad (Som Tum) »

Summer Succotash Salad

Summer Succotash Salad

Thai Pomelo Salad (Dtam Som Oo)

Sweet pomelo pairs beautifully with chiles, peanuts, and mint in this recipe for a classic Thai salad from Talde in Brooklyn, New York. Get the recipe for Thai Pomelo Salad (Dtam Som Oo) »

Thai Green Mango Salad (Som Tum Mamuang)

Thai Green Mango Salad (Som Tum Mamuang)

Avocado-Mango Salad (Saladu Awooka ak Mango)

Creamy avocados and sweet mangoes are marinated in a citrus dressing, composing a bright and refreshing salad that’s the perfect counterpoint to rich and savory stews.

Watermelon, Feta, and Olive Salad

Watermelon, Feta, and Olive Salad

Summer Panzanella

Sweet, ripe, summer tomatoes dressed in olive oil, vinegar, and basil are tossed with garlicky, toasted bread cubes to soak up the delicious juices in this classic Italian salad. Get the recipe for Summer Panzanella »

Fava Bean, Herb, and Pomegranate Fattoush

Fava beans add protein to this take on the Levantine bread salad from Australia-based chef Matt Wilkinson. Get the recipe for Fava Bean, Herb, and Pomegranate Fattoush »

Sautéed Crab with Avocado, Grapefruit, and Herb Salad

Crabmeat is rubbed with a smoky chile paste, then sautéed and tossed in this refreshing salad of creamy avocado, tart grapefruit, and herbs.

Blue Cheese Wedge Salad

Both blue cheese and Italian dressings adorn the classic iceberg wedge salad. Get the recipe for Blue Cheese Wedge Salad »

Red Leaf Salad with Ranch Dressing

Light, tangy yogurt replaces rich mayonnaise in the herb-laced dressing for this salad.

Cucumber Pepper Slaw

Sliced cucumber is tenderized with kosher salt in this zesty slaw. Cucumber Pepper Slaw »

Greek Salad (Horiatiki)

This refreshing salad takes on various guises in Greece depending on what vegetables are in season, but it almost always features feta and a dusting of dried oregano. Get the recipe for Greek Salad (Horiatiki) »

Caesar Salad

This classic salad is easy to make from scratch at home. Get the recipe for Caesar Salad »

Easy Salad Recipes

Landon Nordeman

While grilled, roasted, and boiled components can make for a lovely salad experience, when it comes to flavorful bang-for-your-buck, nothing beats the bright, refreshing ease of a raw salad. These no-cook, easy salad recipes come together in minutes without a stovetop or oven in sight.

Fresh summer tomatoes are so sweet and juicy as to not need any cooking. We love to highlight them in caprese, a classic Italian salad made with fresh burrata and basil and top-shelf extra-virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Tomatoes and basil also match wonderfully with green and romano beans.

Tomatoes play supporting roles in many other salads. Our New Jersey fattoush is an Americanized take on a traditional Middle Eastern bread salad made with iceberg lettuce and crushed pita chips. Tomatoes add a pop of color to traditional Greek and wedge salads.

A fresh fruit salad is incredibly refreshing during the height of summer. Try pairing nectarines and blueberries with bright shiso leaves and lime juice and earthy sesame oil. For a sweet-salty treat, toss watermelon with briny cotija cheese and spicy radish sprouts.

Looking to warm climates can yield inspiration for no-cook recipes. Thailand is a great example. Som tum is a traditional green papaya salad flavored with tamarind juice and fish sauce and packed with all sorts of fresh vegetables. Green mango can be used to make a refreshing variation. For something citrusy, pair sweet pomelo with chiles, peanuts, and mint.

Find all of these dishes and more in our collection of refreshing easy salad recipes.

Tomato Salad with Green Beans and Basil

Tomato Salad with Green Beans and Basil

Peach and Plum Salad

In this salad red wine vinegar balances the sweetness of ripe fruit, while cilantro and basil add a floral note. Get the recipe for Peach and Plum Salad »

Arugula, Radicchio, and Fennel Salad

Walnuts and parmesan add richness to this crunchy salad from The Yellow Table’s Anna Watson Carl. Get the recipe for Arugula, Radicchio, and Fennel Salad »

Marinated Celery and Avocado Salad

Crisp celery and radishes are lightly pickled in lemon juice in this salad from chef Juan Pablo Mellado Arana of Las Cabras in Santiago, which makes a perfect addition to any heavy Chilean meal.

Caprese Salad

A dish as simple as caprese salad demands the best ingredients: Use firm, in-season tomatoes, the freshest burrata, and dress with pristine olive oil and top-quality balsamic vinegar. Get the recipe for Caprese Salad »

Blueberry, Nectarine and Shiso Salad

Bright shiso leaves and a touch of earthy sesame oil enhance this stone fruit and berry salad. Get the recipe for Blueberry, Nectarine and Shiso Salad »

Puntarelle and Dandelion Green Salad with Honey and Olive Vinaigrette

Puntarelle and Dandelion Green Salad with Honey and Olive Vinaigrette

New Jersey Fattoush

Helen Rosner’s mother-in-law is Palestinian, but over forty years of living in the U.S., her fattoush has evolved into something decidedly (and deliciously) Americanized: crushed pita chips, a dressing of lime juice and dried mint, and crisp, sweet iceberg lettuce. Get the recipe for New Jersey Fattoush »

Shaved Cauliflower and Radicchio Salad

Aleppo pepper (a tangy Middle Eastern spice), raisins, and raw cauliflower marry in this simple yet unusual salad. Get the recipe for Shaved Cauliflower and Radicchio Salad »

Thai Green Papaya Salad (Som Tum)

Crusted dried shrimp add an umami boost to this papaya salad. Get the recipe for Thai Green Papaya Salad (Som Tum) »

Thai Pomelo Salad (Dtam Som Oo)

Sweet pomelo pairs beautifully with chiles, peanuts, and mint in this recipe for a classic Thai salad from Talde in Brooklyn, New York. Get the recipe for Thai Pomelo Salad (Dtam Som Oo) »

Tricolore Salad with Grapefruit Saba Vinaigrette

Grapefruit supremes (segments of pulp separated from the membrane) and aged balsamic vinegar brighten this classic Italian salad from author Dana Bowen. Get the recipe for Tricolore Salad with Grapefruit Saba Vinaigrette »

Watermelon Salad with Cilantro, Radish Sprouts, and Cotija

In this refreshing salad, watermelon at the peak of its sweetness is tossed in a zesty vinaigrette with spicy radish sprouts. Get the recipe for Watermelon Salad with Cilantro, Radish Sprouts, and Cotija »

Shirazi Salad

This refreshing salad is made of cucumbers, tomatoes, and red onion.

Thai Green Mango Salad (Som Tum Mamuang)

This dish is a refreshing adaptation of a more widely known version made with papaya. Get the recipe for Thai Green Mango Salad (Som Tum Mamuang) »

Israeli Chopped Salad

Sumac and cinnamon heightens the flavors of this Israeli staple.

Kohlrabi and Watercress Salad

For a twist on the classic Waldorf salad, try tossing sweet apples with crisp watercress and nutty kohlrabi in a sumac-infused yogurt dressing.

Avocado-Mango Salad (Saladu Awooka ak Mango)

The creamy avocado, sweet mango, and bright citrus in this salad make a refreshing counterpoint to Senegal’s rich and savory stews. Get the recipe for Avocado-Mango Salad (Saladu Awooka ak Mango) »

Greek Salad (Horiatiki)

This refreshing salad takes on various guises in Greece depending on what vegetables are in season, but it almost always features feta and a dusting of dried oregano. Get the recipe for Greek Salad (Horiatiki) »

Cucumber Pepper Slaw

Sliced cucumber is tenderized with kosher salt in this zesty slaw. Cucumber Pepper Slaw »

Hawaiian-Style Sesame Cabbage Salad

Cabbage salads featuring dried noodles are a staple of Hawaiian home cooking, adding crunch, texture, and sweetness to this terrifically versatile slaw. Get the recipe for Hawaiian-Style Sesame Cabbage Salad »

41 Non-Dessert Ways To Eat Your Fruit This Summer

Fruit obviously lends itself to desserts. Fruit pies, fruit crumbles, fruit crisps. Fruit compote on cake, fruit in ice cream, fruit on its own. When it's hot and you need something refreshing, summer fruit -- from tart blackberries to sugary strawberries and juicy peaches -- just screams dessert. There's a savory side to summer fruit, however, that definitely deserves your attention.

Too many people forget or simply wouldn't think to put fruit in savory dishes. But fresh fruit, summer fruit in particular, can really add something special to your recipes. When combined with the right ingredients, summer fruit can take on a savory flavor that's far from dessert territory -- and just as good.

Once you try adding fruit to your savory dishes, you'll see what you've been missing all this time. We think summer fruit is the best fruit. Here are 41 savory fruit recipes so that you can eat summer fruit all the time.


37 Delicious Healthy Salads That Are Fresh and Filling

Reboot your lunch routine with these healthy salads that offer all the nutritional benefits of heaps of greens (reds and oranges, too), yet are satisfying and truly delicious. No matter which types of salads you crave, make sure to start with a healthy salad dressing, preferably one that&rsquos homemade (psst, check out our vegan salad dressings). From there, your choices abound: Looking for vegetarian recipes? Want to make an (easy) weeknight dinner for the whole family? Planning on using your salad as a side dish to supplement your favorite seared pork recipes or even store-bought rotisserie chicken? We got you.

So what are the healthiest salads? You can choose a wide variety of veggies &mdash the more colorful the better &mdash to help ensure that you get an array of nutrients, and look for ones that are high in fiber, which will keep you feeling satisfied. Use creamy dressings sparingly, and make judicious use of cheese: pick more flavorful types, like feta or parm, that will pack a punch even with small amounts. Instead of croutons, try a handful of sunflower seeds or pepitas. Herbs are perfect for adding flavor without any fat, just make sure to give 'em a wash and dry (it's easy with a pick from our best salad spinners), especially if they're a little sandy.

GET MORE RECIPES! Sign up for our membership club GH+ to get a first look at seasonal, healthy recipes from the magazine.


Watch the video: Χριστουγεννιάτικη πράσινη Σαλάτα με ρόκα, πορτοκάλι και καρύδια


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